Buy “The Hunger Games (Book 1) (9780545091022) Suzanne Collins, Carolyn McCormick Books” Online

The Hunger Games (Book 1) Audio CD – Audiobook, CD by Suzanne Collins (Author)

The book came packaged nicely and arrived on time. As a huge Hunger Games fan, I was extremely excited to receive this book. I’ve been completely obsessed with Hunger Games for several years, never miss any books or movies of it. The authors imagination is amazing which draw me into the story so completely that it’s hard to put the book down. Trust me, you won’t be disappointed. All in all, this is a really good book which are a great gift for every Hunger Games fan! Check it out!

From Publishers Weekly Starred Review. Reviewed by Megan Whalen Turner If there really are only seven original plots in the world, it’s odd that boy meets girl is always mentioned, and society goes bad and attacks the good guy never is. Yet we have Fahrenheit 451, The Giver, The House of the Scorpion—and now, following a long tradition of Brave New Worlds, The Hunger Games. Collins hasn’t tied her future to a specific date, or weighted it down with too much finger wagging. Rather less 1984 and rather more Death Race 2000, hers is a gripping story set in a postapocalyptic world where a replacement for the United States demands a tribute from each of its territories: two children to be used as gladiators in a televised fight to the death.Katniss, from what was once Appalachia, offers to take the place of her sister in the Hunger Games, but after this ultimate sacrifice, she is entirely focused on survival at any cost. It is her teammate, Peeta, who recognizes the importance of holding on to one’s humanity in such inhuman circumstances. It’s a credit to Collins’s skill at characterization that Katniss, like a new Theseus, is cold, calculating and still likable. She has the attributes to be a winner, where Peeta has the grace to be a good loser.It’s no accident that these games are presented as pop culture. Every generation projects its fear: runaway science, communism, overpopulation, nuclear wars and, now, reality TV. The State of Panem—which needs to keep its tributaries subdued and its citizens complacent—may have created the Games, but mindless television is the real danger, the means by which society pacifies its citizens and punishes those who fail to conform. Will its connection to reality TV, ubiquitous today, date the book? It might, but for now, it makes this the right book at the right time. What happens if we choose entertainment over humanity? In Collins’s world, we’ll be obsessed with grooming, we’ll talk funny, and all our sentences will end with the same rise as questions. When Katniss is sent to stylists to be made more telegenic before she competes, she stands naked in front of them, strangely unembarrassed. They’re so unlike people that I’m no more self-conscious than if a trio of oddly colored birds were pecking around my feet, she thinks. In order not to hate these creatures who are sending her to her death, she imagines them as pets. It isn’t just the contestants who risk the loss of their humanity. It is all who watch. Katniss struggles to win not only the Games but the inherent contest for audience approval. Because this is the first book in a series, not everything is resolved, and what is left unanswered is the central question. Has she sacrificed too much? We know what she has given up to survive, but not whether the price was too high. Readers will wait eagerly to learn more.Megan Whalen Turner is the author of the Newbery Honor book The Thief and its sequels, The Queen of Attolia and The King of Attolia. The next book in the series will be published by Greenwillow in 2010. Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. –This text refers to the Paperback edition.


The Hunger Games (Book 1) Audio CD – Audiobook, CD by Suzanne Collins (Author) Review

Before reading The Hunger Games trilogy, I had more than a few people tell me the first two books were good, but the last one was lacking. I couldn’t disagree more. The story is harsh, gruesome, and bleak. It had to be. It’s a first person account of an individual who has survived two Hunger Games and plays a major role in a revolution. Of course it’s going to be brutal. Had the story drawn to a close with Katniss standing majestically with trumpets blaring and flags waving, it would have been completely unrealistic. I also heard a few people express disappointment in the conclusion of the Katniss/Peeta storyline. I’ve read people’s reviews taking issue with how Katniss and Peeta are represented at the end of Mockingjay, asking "Where’s the passion?" Passion? Are they insane? First of all, the story is told in first person by a character who is admittedly not at all comfortable being demonstrative and doesn’t respond well to those who are. There was never going to be a hearts/candy/flowers declaration happening here. Peeta has a borderline obssessive love for Katniss throughout most of the trilogy. The way I read the story, by the end of the first Hunger Games, she returns the feeling. Though hesitant to think why she does the things she does, or to state it aloud, she expresses it in so many different ways throughout the remainder of the trilogy, there really is no doubt. Despite the fact that she is suffering major PTSD, she agrees to take on the stress of being the symbol of revolution and take a front line role to bring him back. Regardless of the amount of trauma they both endure, they still eventually turn back to each other. Gale was a strong character, but he had not gone through what Katniss did in the arena and would never have been able to understand that part of her. The time she spends clinging to him and avoiding Peeta is essentially an attempt to return to the person she was before the games (which was never going to happen). Peeta was the walking, living, breathing reminder of the trauma endured. I thought it telling that Peeta returned to Region 12. Like Gale, he could have gone anywhere when it was all over, yet he went where Katniss was. Really, Katniss, Peeta and Haymitch needed each other to become human again (or as human as they were ever going to be). Katniss reminded me of uncles I had who, when they returned from war, sat in a darkened room, staring at a wall day after day for over a year before they could handle being amongst the living again. I’ll admit part of me would have liked President Snow’s demise to be more than it was. Considering the amount of suffering he caused, part of me is bloodthirsty enough to have wanted him to suffer a great deal more. There are also characters I would have liked to survive (Finnick, Cinna, and Prim to name a few), but their deaths helped to illustrate the randomness and unfairness of death in wartime. There are parts of this story we’ll never get to see because it is told from Katniss’ point of view. We see only what she sees and know only what she thinks is going on. I, for one, would be interested in knowing more about events of the story from Peeta and/or Haymitch’s point of view. Peeta’s fight back from his memory hijacking would be an intriguing read. Ultimately, I found this book engaging, infuriating, exhausting, and funny all at the same time. To have had Katniss serene and sweetly declaring life to be sunshine, lollipops, and rainbows would have been absurd. She is with a husband (partner?) whom she loves and is utterly devoted to. She has two children she loves, but is worried what they will think when they know the role their parents played in the past. She and Peeta are happy, but remain somewhat haunted which is perfectly realistic for what the characters have gone through. -Read Reviews-

I decided to purchase the series because I couldn’t wait until the release of the last film to find out what happened with Peeta. I was going to skip to the last book because in my head, 2 months would not be enough to read the whole series and I feared not getting into them as much. Boy was I wrong. My husband suggested I start from scratch as films always leave out a TON of detail and I’m so glad I listened to him. Once I started I could not put the books down and the cliffhangers at the end of each chapter always left you wanting to find out what happens next. The films do, in fact, leave out a TON of detail (and characters) and in just a week I went through the entire trilogy. English is not my first language so the simplicity of the dialogue was a huge breath of fresh air. I often find myself avoiding Anglo literature because of the unnecessary complexity of the narrative and although this book was very easy to read it doesn’t feel juvenile. All in all, loved the series and would recommend them to anyone.

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